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Tips of Famous Writers for Improving Your Style (Infographic)

If you’ve ever dreamed of being able to write as good as Ernest Hemingway or Agatha Christie, there’s a way to make your dream come true. We’ve gathered some of the most helpful tips famous authors can give you in this post. You’ll get to know why it’s important to read your material out loud and how to invent your own genre. Find the unique style of writing using the new techniques and exciting secrets of your beloved authors.

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Why Higher Education Is Still Important? [Infographic]

It’s not a secret that a lot of school graduates are not sure of whether they have to go to college to get a decent job in the future. It may be enough to read the necessary books and pass several online courses to reach your goal. There are some great examples of famous billionaires who never went to college and still managed to become rich and successful. Can you be like one of them or it’s better to get the benefits of higher education?

Education Around The Globe

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EssayTyper.com VS CheapWritingService.com

There are numerous online services that can make your student life easier. Some of them are just for fun or inspiration; others can really help you with the most difficult assignments. This infographic will show you the benefits of both such services and you’ll know which one to use when you can’t get any further with your paper.

EssayTyper.com VS CheapWritingService.com

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Essay Writing Guide. The Whole Essay Writing Process in Just 5 Simple Steps.

Wouldn’t it be great to have all the essay writing tips in one place? We thought that it’s a good idea and developed a special guide for you. It has a detailed description of every writing stage and how to cope with it faster and more effectively. You don’t have to spend a lot of time looking for the necessary information because our college essay writing service has taken care of it. You can find every valuable tip in one place – in this guide.

Essay Writing Guide

Table of Contents Continue reading “Essay Writing Guide. The Whole Essay Writing Process in Just 5 Simple Steps.” »

5 Best Cheap Essay Writing Services for Students in 2024

How many hours a week does an average student spend on writing assignments? Even though it is difficult to specify an exact number of hours, no one can deny that writing assignments are time-consuming. Students are in constant search of effective ways of making their schedules less busy. That is why hiring an assistant at the best cheap essay writing service seems like a good idea to many of them. It is a fast and secure approach to solving writing problems. Your assistant can give you writing tips and deliver a flawlessly written essay in less than 4 hours. Meanwhile, you can take care of all the unfinished tasks that have been making your schedule look frustrating if you choose the cheapest essay writing service.

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100 Unique Argumentative Essay Topics

In the dynamic realm of discourse and dialogue, the art of argumentation holds a unique place. From academia to everyday conversations, argumentative essays allow us to explore multifaceted issues, share viewpoints, and inspire critical thinking. But the key to sparking engaging debates lies in the heart of the subject matter – the topic. Continue reading “100 Unique Argumentative Essay Topics” »

100 Easy Argumentative Essay Topics (may 2023)

Welcome to our comprehensive list of easy argumentative essay topics! If you’re looking for captivating and thought-provoking subjects to explore in your next writing assignment, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, we have carefully curated a collection of 100 topics that are not only easy to research and discuss but also have the potential to go viral on social media. These topics cover a diverse range of areas, from technology and education to ethics and social issues. So, whether you’re a student searching for an interesting topic or a writer seeking viral content ideas, this list is sure to inspire you. Let’s dive into the world of easy argumentative essay topics that are both engaging and shareable! Continue reading “100 Easy Argumentative Essay Topics (may 2023)” »

100+ Psychology Argumentative Essay Topics

Psychology is a fascinating field that delves into the complexities of human behavior, cognition, and emotions. As our understanding of the human mind continues to evolve, numerous thought-provoking topics emerge for argumentative essays in psychology. These topics challenge us to critically analyze theories, research findings, and societal issues related to mental processes and behavior. In this essay, we will explore 100 argumentative essay topics in psychology, covering a wide range of subjects that invite discussion and debate. These topics offer an opportunity to delve into the depths of human nature, exploring the factors that shape our thoughts, actions, and interactions with the world around us. From controversial ethical dilemmas to investigations of cognitive processes, these topics will provoke thought, stimulate conversation, and shed light on the intricate workings of the human mind. Continue reading “100+ Psychology Argumentative Essay Topics” »

How to End a College Essay: Crafting the Perfect Conclusion

A strong conclusion is crucial to leaving a lasting impression on your readers. In this guide, we’ll discuss various strategies for ending your college essay with a bang, ensuring you leave your audience captivated and engaged.

Understanding the Importance of a Conclusion

The conclusion of your essay is your final opportunity to reinforce your key points, leaving your readers with a clear understanding of your argument or message. A well-crafted conclusion is vital to wrapping up your essay effectively and can make the difference between a memorable essay and one that fades from memory.

Example: A persuasive essay on climate change might end by summarizing the consequences of inaction and offering a call to action for readers to take steps towards mitigating the issue.

Tips for Writing a Compelling Conclusion

1. Restate your thesis

Your conclusion should start by restating your thesis statement in a new, engaging way. By rephrasing your thesis, you remind your readers of the central argument of your essay without sounding repetitive.

Example: “As we have explored throughout this essay, the importance of implementing sustainable practices cannot be underestimated.”

2. Summarize your main points

Briefly summarize your main points, demonstrating how they support your thesis statement. This helps reinforce your argument and provides a sense of closure for your readers.

Example: “From examining the impact of carbon emissions on our environment to exploring alternative energy sources, it’s clear that we must take action now to protect our planet for future generations.”

3. Provide a broader perspective

Offer a broader perspective on the topic, giving your readers something to ponder as they finish reading your essay. This can be a thought-provoking statement, a question, or a call to action.

Example: “If we don’t act now, what kind of world will we be leaving for our children and grandchildren?”

4. End with a memorable quote or anecdote

Including a relevant quote or anecdote can leave a lasting impression and make your conclusion more memorable.

Example: “As environmentalist Rachel Carson once said, ‘In nature, nothing exists alone.’ It’s our responsibility to work together to protect our planet.”

5. Avoid introducing new information

Resist the temptation to introduce new information or arguments in your conclusion. Instead, focus on reinforcing the points you’ve already made throughout your essay.

Common Mistakes to Avoid in Your Conclusion

  1. Being too repetitive: While restating your thesis and main points is essential, avoid simply copying and pasting from earlier sections of your essay. Instead, rephrase your ideas in a fresh and engaging manner.
  2. Using clichés: Steer clear of overused phrases and clichés, such as “in conclusion” or “in summary.” Instead, use more original and engaging language to maintain your readers’ interest.
  3. Ending too abruptly: Your conclusion should provide a sense of closure and wrap up your essay in a satisfying way. Avoid ending your essay too abruptly or leaving your readers hanging.

Conclusion

Ending your college essay on a strong note is essential to making a lasting impression on your readers. By restating your thesis, summarizing your main points, and providing a broader perspective, you can craft a compelling conclusion that will leave your audience engaged and inspired.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is the purpose of a conclusion in a college essay?

The conclusion serves to reinforce your key points, provide a sense of closure, and leave a lasting impression on your readers.

  1. How long should a conclusion be in a college essay?

A conclusion should be around 5-7% of the total word count of your essay. For a standard 500-word essay, a conclusion of 25-35 words is usually sufficient. However, the length may vary depending on the complexity and overall length of your essay.

  1. How can I make my conclusion more engaging?

To make your conclusion more engaging, consider using thought-provoking statements, questions, or calls to action. Including a memorable quote or anecdote can also make your conclusion stand out.

  1. Is it okay to use a quote in my conclusion?

Yes, using a quote in your conclusion can be an effective way to leave a lasting impression. However, make sure the quote is relevant to your essay topic and adds value to your conclusion.

  1. What should I avoid in my conclusion?

Avoid introducing new information, being too repetitive, using clichés, and ending your essay too abruptly. Instead, focus on reinforcing your thesis and main points in a fresh and engaging manner.

How Long Is a Short Essay?

Defining a Short Essay

Length and Word Count

A short essay typically ranges from 300 to 500 words, which is roughly one to two pages in length. This brief format allows writers to present a single idea or argument concisely and effectively.

Purpose

Short essays are designed to test a writer’s ability to present a clear and focused argument or analysis in a limited space. They often serve as assignments in high school and college courses, as well as in professional settings.

Structure of a Short Essay

Introduction

A short essay should begin with a compelling introduction that grabs the reader’s attention and introduces the topic or argument. In a short essay, the introduction is usually one paragraph long.

Body

The body of a short essay consists of two to three paragraphs. Each paragraph should focus on a single point that supports the main argument. It is essential to use clear and concise language and provide relevant examples and evidence to support your points.

Conclusion

The conclusion of a short essay should summarize the main points and reiterate the central argument. It should leave the reader with a clear understanding of the topic and the writer’s perspective.

Best Practices for Writing a Short Essay

Plan Your Essay

Before starting to write a short essay, it is vital to plan your composition. Outline your main points and ensure that your ideas flow logically and cohesively. This will help you avoid unnecessary repetition and create a more effective essay.

Use Clear and Concise Language

In a short essay, there is limited space to convey your ideas. Use clear and concise language to present your points effectively. Avoid lengthy sentences and complex vocabulary that may confuse the reader.

Provide Relevant Examples

To support your argument or analysis, provide relevant examples from multiple sources. This will help to validate your points and make your essay more engaging and persuasive.

Edit and Revise

After completing your short essay, take the time to edit and revise your work. Check for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors, and ensure that your essay flows smoothly and logically.

Examples of Short Essays from Different Authors

  1. George Orwell’s “A Hanging”: In this short essay, Orwell presents a powerful argument against capital punishment through a personal account of witnessing a prisoner’s execution.
  2. Virginia Woolf’s “Street Haunting”: Woolf’s short essay explores the experience of walking through London and the observations and reflections it evokes.
  3. James Baldwin’s “Notes of a Native Son”: Baldwin’s short essay examines the impact of race and racism on his life and experiences in America.

Conclusion

A short essay is a concise composition that typically ranges from 300 to 500 words. It requires a clear and focused argument or analysis, presented in a well-structured format. By understanding the length, structure, and best practices for writing short essays, you can create high-quality compositions that effectively convey your ideas and perspectives. With insights from various authors, this guide offers a comprehensive understanding of the short essay format, helping you to excel in your writing endeavors.

How to write a movie title in an essay

By following these guidelines, you will ensure that your essay is well-structured, easy to read, and adheres to academic writing standards.

Formatting Movie Titles in Text

Italics

One of the most common ways to format movie titles in an essay is to use italics. Italicizing movie titles helps to set them apart from the rest of the text, allowing readers to easily identify them as separate works. For example:

The Godfather is a classic example of a crime drama.

Quotation Marks

In some cases, such as when following specific style guidelines, you may need to use quotation marks instead of italics for movie titles. This is less common, but still acceptable in certain contexts. For example:

“The Shawshank Redemption” is an inspiring story of hope and redemption.

Citation Styles and Formatting

APA Style

The American Psychological Association (APA) citation style requires you to include the movie’s director, release year, and title in italics when citing a film in your essay. For example:

(Coppola, 1972)

MLA Style

The Modern Language Association (MLA) citation style requires the movie’s title in italics, followed by the director’s name and the release year. For example:

The Godfather. Dir. Francis Ford Coppola. 1972.

Chicago Style

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) citation format also requires the movie’s title in italics, followed by the director’s name, release year, and other relevant details. For example:

The Godfather, directed by Francis Ford Coppola, 1972.

Tips for Writing Movie Titles in an Essay

Be Consistent

When writing movie titles in an essay, it is essential to maintain consistency in formatting and citation style throughout the entire paper. This helps to ensure that your essay is clear, cohesive, and professional.

Follow Your Instructor’s Guidelines

Always follow your instructor’s guidelines for formatting movie titles and citations in your essay. If your instructor has specific requirements that differ from standard citation styles, be sure to adhere to those rules.

Double-Check Your Formatting

Before submitting your essay, double-check the formatting of all movie titles to ensure they are consistent and adhere to the appropriate citation style. This will help to prevent any potential confusion for your readers.

Examples of Properly Formatted Movie Titles

  1. APA Style: Pulp Fiction (Tarantino, 1994) explores the lives of various criminals in a nonlinear narrative.
  2. MLA Style: In Fight Club (Fincher, 1999), a disillusioned man forms an underground fight club to cope with his existential crisis.
  3. Chicago Style: The Dark Knight (Nolan, 2008) is a critically acclaimed exploration of the Batman mythos.

Addressing Multiple Movies in an Essay

Comparing and Contrasting

When discussing multiple movies in an essay, you may need to compare and contrast the films, analyzing their similarities and differences. Be sure to format each movie title consistently and use clear, concise language to convey your analysis.

Listing Movies

If you need to list multiple movies in an essay, separate each title with a comma and a space. Ensure that all movie titles are formatted consistently, either in italics or with quotation marks, depending on your chosen citation style. For example:

Inception (2010), Memento (2000), and Interstellar (2014) are all thought-provoking films directed by Christopher Nolan.

Conclusion

Writing movie titles in an essay requires attention to detail and adherence to formatting and citation guidelines. By following these best practices, you will ensure that your essay is well-structured, easy to read, and meets academic writing standards. Consistency in formatting and citation style is crucial, as is following your instructor’s specific guidelines. With these tips in mind, you can confidently include movie titles in your essay and effectively analyze and discuss the films in question.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Should I italicize movie titles in an essay?

Yes, it is common practice to italicize movie titles in an essay. This helps to set them apart from the rest of the text and makes them easily identifiable as separate works.

  1. How do I cite a movie in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles?
  • APA: (Director’s Last Name, Release Year)
  • MLA: Movie Title. Dir. Director’s Name. Release Year.
  • Chicago: Movie Title, directed by Director’s Name, Release Year.
  1. Can I use quotation marks instead of italics for movie titles in an essay?

While italics are the most common method of formatting movie titles, some specific style guidelines may require the use of quotation marks instead. Always follow your instructor’s guidelines and the citation style you are using.

  1. How do I list multiple movies in an essay?

When listing multiple movies in an essay, separate each title with a comma and a space. Ensure that all movie titles are formatted consistently, either in italics or with quotation marks, depending on your chosen citation style.

  1. How do I compare and contrast multiple movies in an essay?

When comparing and contrasting multiple movies in an essay, be sure to format each movie title consistently and use clear, concise language to convey your analysis. Discuss the similarities and differences between the films and provide evidence and examples to support your claims.

How to Write a Thesis for a Compare and Contrast Essay

A well-written thesis statement sets the tone for your essay, outlines the main points of comparison, and provides a clear roadmap for your readers.

Understanding the Compare and Contrast Essay

Defining the Compare and Contrast Essay

A compare and contrast essay is a type of academic writing that analyzes the similarities and differences between two subjects. These subjects are typically related in some way, such as two historical events, literary works, or scientific concepts.

Purpose of a Compare and Contrast Essay

The primary goal of a compare and contrast essay is to evaluate the similarities and differences between two subjects, enabling readers to gain a deeper understanding of both topics. This type of essay fosters critical thinking and helps develop analytical skills.

Crafting a Strong Thesis Statement

Importance of a Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is a vital component of any essay, as it presents the central argument or claim you will explore throughout your paper. In a compare and contrast essay, the thesis statement should clearly state the subjects being compared and the basis for comparison.

Characteristics of an Effective Thesis Statement

An effective thesis statement for a compare and contrast essay should possess the following qualities:

  1. Clarity: It should be clear and easy to understand.
  2. Specificity: It should focus on the main points of comparison between the two subjects.
  3. Arguable: It should present a claim that can be debated or discussed.
  4. Concise: It should be brief and to the point.

Steps to Develop a Thesis Statement

  1. Choose your subjects: Select two subjects that are related in some way and have enough similarities and differences to warrant a comparison.
  2. Identify the basis for comparison: Determine the specific aspects of each subject that you will compare and contrast.
  3. Craft a clear and concise statement: Combine the subjects and the basis for comparison into a single sentence that encapsulates the main argument of your essay.

Examples of Thesis Statements

Literature

In “The Great Gatsby” and “Death of a Salesman,” both protagonists, Jay Gatsby and Willy Loman, pursue the American Dream, but their contrasting motivations and personal values ultimately lead to their tragic downfalls.

Science

While solar power and wind power are both popular forms of renewable energy, their differences in reliability, efficiency, and environmental impact make them suitable for different applications.

History

The American Revolution and the French Revolution share common themes of social inequality and the pursuit of liberty, but their outcomes diverge due to differences in leadership and historical context.

Organizing Your Compare and Contrast Essay

Block Method

The block method involves discussing one subject in its entirety before moving on to the other subject. This approach is suitable when comparing and contrasting subjects with many differences or when the subjects are complex.

Example Outline

I. Introduction

II. Subject A

A. Point of Comparison 1

B. Point of Comparison 2

C. Point of Comparison 3

III. Subject B

A. Point of Comparison 1

B. Point of Comparison 2

C. Point of Comparison 3

IV. Conclusion

Point-by-Point Method

The point-by-point method involves discussing each point of comparison in turn, alternating between the two subjects. This approach is more suitable for subjects with fewer differences or when the subjects are simpler.

Example Outline

I. Introduction

II. Point of Comparison 1

A. Subject A

B. Subject B

III. Point of Comparison 2

A. Subject A

B. Subject B

IV. Point of Comparison 3

A. Subject A

B. Subject B

V. Conclusion

Writing the Compare and Contrast Essay

Introduction

Begin your compare and contrast essay with an engaging introduction that captures the reader’s attention and provides context for your thesis statement. Include background information on the subjects and introduce the main points of comparison.

Body Paragraphs

Develop your body paragraphs by presenting the points of comparison, providing evidence and examples to support your claims. Make sure to use appropriate transitions to maintain a smooth flow and ensure that each paragraph focuses on a single point of comparison.

Conclusion

Conclude your compare and contrast essay by summarizing the main points of comparison and restating your thesis statement. Offer insight into the significance of the similarities and differences, and discuss the broader implications of your analysis.

Revising and Editing Your Essay

Review for Clarity and Coherence

After completing your first draft, read through your essay to ensure that your thesis statement is clear and your points of comparison are logically organized. Make sure your essay flows smoothly and your arguments are well-supported with evidence and examples.

Proofread for Grammar and Punctuation

Carefully proofread your essay, checking for grammatical errors, punctuation mistakes, and typos. Ensure that your writing is clear, concise, and free of errors.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is a compare and contrast essay?

A compare and contrast essay is a type of academic writing that analyzes the similarities and differences between two related subjects.

  1. What is the purpose of a thesis statement in a compare and contrast essay?

A thesis statement in a compare and contrast essay presents the central argument, establishes the subjects being compared, and outlines the basis for comparison.

  1. What are the characteristics of an effective thesis statement?

An effective thesis statement should be clear, specific, arguable, and concise.

  1. What are the two methods for organizing a compare and contrast essay?

The two methods for organizing a compare and contrast essay are the block method and the point-by-point method.

  1. What should be included in the conclusion of a compare and contrast essay?

The conclusion of a compare and contrast essay should summarize the main points of comparison, restate the thesis statement, and discuss the significance and broader implications of the analysis.

How Does an Effective Argumentative Essay Address Counterclaims?

Introduction

In this article, we will explore the process of addressing counterclaims in an effective argumentative essay. A well-structured argumentative essay not only presents a clear and persuasive argument but also anticipates and addresses counterarguments. By incorporating counterclaims, you demonstrate your understanding of opposing viewpoints and strengthen your overall argument.

Importance of Addressing Counterclaims

Demonstrates a Thorough Understanding of the Topic

By addressing counterclaims, you show your readers that you have a comprehensive understanding of the topic. For example, in an essay about the benefits of electric cars, acknowledging concerns about battery life and charging infrastructure demonstrates your awareness of potential drawbacks. Another example would be discussing the privacy concerns associated with the use of facial recognition technology while arguing for its benefits in enhancing security.

Builds a Stronger Argument

When you address counterclaims and refute them effectively, you reinforce the strength of your argument. For instance, if you’re arguing for the adoption of a plant-based diet, you might address the counterclaim that plant-based diets lack sufficient protein and respond by providing evidence of protein-rich plant sources. Similarly, when arguing for renewable energy, you could address concerns about its reliability by presenting data on advancements in energy storage technologies.

Engages the Reader

Incorporating counterclaims keeps the reader engaged, as it allows them to consider various perspectives. For example, in an essay about the importance of social media in modern society, addressing counterclaims related to the negative impact on mental health and privacy issues encourages the reader to think critically about the topic. In an essay advocating for remote work, discussing potential drawbacks such as decreased social interaction and collaboration can lead the reader to appreciate the nuance of the argument.

Identifying Counterclaims

Research and Preparation

Before addressing counterclaims, you must first identify them. This requires thorough research and preparation. For example, when writing about the positive effects of video games, you should research the arguments against them, such as addiction and potential negative effects on social skills.

Determine the Most Relevant Counterclaims

Select the counterclaims that are most relevant to your argument. These should be the most common, persuasive, or significant counterclaims that directly challenge your main points. For instance, when arguing for the legalization of marijuana, you would need to address concerns about potential health risks and increased substance abuse.

Addressing Counterclaims in Your Argumentative Essay

Incorporate Counterclaims in the Appropriate Sections

Introduce counterclaims within the body of your essay, ideally after presenting your main arguments. This allows you to set the stage for your refutation and maintain a logical flow. For example, in an essay supporting the use of vaccinations, you might first present the benefits and then address common counterclaims, such as concerns about side effects or the effectiveness of vaccines.

Use Clear and Concise Language

When presenting counterclaims, use clear and concise language to accurately portray the opposing viewpoint. For example, when discussing the counterclaim that GMOs are harmful to human health, clearly state the concern before proceeding to refute it with scientific evidence.

Refute Counterclaims Thoroughly

Refute counterclaims by providing evidence, reasoning, or examples that support your argument. For instance, in an essay arguing for stricter gun control, you might address the counterclaim that gun control infringes on Second Amendment rights by citing legal interpretations and historical context.

Maintain a Respectful Tone

When addressing counterclaims, maintain a respectful tone. For example, if discussing the counterclaim that climate change is a natural process, avoid using derogatory language and instead focus on presenting scientific evidence to refute the claim.

Conclusion

Addressing counterclaims effectively is crucial for a strong argumentative essay. By identifying and refuting counterclaims, you demonstrate a thorough understanding of the topic, build a stronger argument, and engage the reader. To achieve this, incorporate counterclaims in appropriate sections, use clear and concise language, refute counterclaims thoroughly, and maintain a respectful tone. By addressing counterclaims and their respective refutations, you create a well-rounded essay that invites critical thinking and leaves a lasting impression on your audience.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Why is it important to address counterclaims in an argumentative essay?

Addressing counterclaims is important because it demonstrates your understanding of opposing viewpoints, strengthens your argument, and engages the reader by encouraging critical thinking.

  1. How do I identify counterclaims for my argumentative essay?

Identify counterclaims by conducting thorough research on the topic and selecting the most relevant opposing viewpoints that challenge your main arguments.

  1. Where should I incorporate counterclaims in my essay?

Incorporate counterclaims within the body of your essay, ideally after presenting your main arguments, to maintain a logical flow and set the stage for refutation.

  1. How can I refute counterclaims effectively?

Refute counterclaims effectively by providing evidence, reasoning, or examples that support your argument and thoroughly disprove the opposing viewpoint.

  1. What tone should I use when addressing counterclaims?

Maintain a respectful tone when addressing counterclaims, avoiding derogatory or dismissive language that could alienate your reader or weaken your argument. Focus on presenting facts and evidence to support your position.

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